Finding Home Book BOGO Pre-Order Bonus

Finding Home: Third Culture Kids in the World is coming out on May 22, 2018!

Read on to find out how to get a FREE COPY!

You can order the book now. Like right now. Today. Pre-order, that is.

Why would you want to do that?

Because if you do, you’ll get the pre-order bonus of Buy One, Get One. BOGO!

Yup. If you buy the book, I will gift another copy of it to the person of your choice. So really, its you gifting them the book.

Pre order the book, email me (rachelpiehjones(@)gmail(dot)com) and let me know you’ve ordered (include a copy of the receipt) and let me know who you would like to send the free book to. Also include their email address (I won’t add it to my lists or do anything weird with it, I promise to only use it to send them their book). I’ll include a message explaining who is sending them the book as well as any other note you might like me to include.

Who would you want to gift it to?

Third Culture Kids in your life

A graduating senior

Parents who are thinking of making the move abroad

Grandparents of TCKs

Educators

People in your company/sending organization/NGO leadership

Friends

Anyone you would like to engage in conversation about TCK topics

Anyone at all

Know someone who loves or is and engages with a Third Culture Kid but who might not find this book, or might not buy it, or might not pay for it?

Gift it to them.

Pre-order here.

Tell me you did it, send me the info, and the day the book is released, they will get a special surprise in their inbox.

Finding Home, Third Culture Kids in the World. E-book Announcement!

Back in 2012-13 I hosted a guest post series on Djibouti Jones called Painting Pictures, about raising, being, and loving Third Culture Kids.

Now, six years later, it is time to revisit the essays, the authors, and the ideas. I compiled the posts, combined them with interviews and updates from the authors, and included a few suggestions for how to take the essays and make them personal for your own family and experience.

The final product is a book called Finding Home: Third Culture Kids in the World and it will be available on May 22!

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Here’s a preview. Special thanks to Cecily Paterson, for creating the lovely cover. And special thanks to all the essay contributors! You’ll hear more about them in the coming weeks.

Worlds Apart, a Book Review

Worlds Apart, by Marilyn Gardner

This is the revised version of Passages Through Pakistan and I had the incredible honor of writing the forward. Marilyn has been an online shepherd for me for over five years now. Though we haven’t met (yet) in person, she knows and holds, with gentle wisdom, the deep waters of my heart. When I’ve agonized over boarding school woes or needed someone to pull me together after writerly rejections, Marilyn always has a word of hope and perspective.

Just because I love her, doesn’t mean you will. But. I’m sure you will, after you read her words. Don’t take my word for it, delve into her wisdom on your own. If you haven’t found her website yet, check out Communicating Across Boundaries. If you wonder about her thoughts on being a Third Culture Kid, read Between Worlds. And if you want to know what made her into the generous, creative, thoughtful, joyful person she is today, here is Worlds Apart.

Through trauma and laughter, boarding school in Pakistan to transitioning to the United States, Marilyn opens up her experiences so we can benefit from her perspective and example.

One scene, among many, that pricked my heart is of Marilyn’s mother attempting to plant a garden in Pakistan. She longs for the vibrant colors of the place she left behind but the earth is unrelenting and nothing will grow. Finally, she gives up and plants fake flowers, for the splash of brightness. From a distance, at least, it is beautiful. And then, it is stolen. Marilyn remembers thinking, as a child, “I thought we were loved.” Why would someone steal flowers from someone they loved?

The story captures the hard work, creativity, delight, devastation, and recovery inherent in so many experiences of living abroad.

The last chapter is especially pertinent to me personally, as I’m about to launch my twins back to the US for university. She offers practical tips and deeper, heart-level suggestions on how Third Culture Kids can process and grow in their unique lives.

If you are a Third Culture Kids, or know or love one, if haven’t lived abroad but you’d like to glimpse the realities of someone who has, if want to see beauty in crossing cultures, you will love this book.

Gifts for Third Culture Kids

Third Culture Kids have the world at their fingertips. They hike volcanoes, watch wildebeest migrations, don’t need language apps because they actually know several. Plus, they probably live far away from a lot of the people who love them and want to give them a gift. So what are some good gift ideas for the Third Culture Kids in your life?

Between Worlds

By Marilyn Gardner and also, Passages through Pakistan

Dreams from My Father

By Barack Obama, a fellow Third Culture Kid, not too shabby of a fellow TCK companion.

Books for younger TCKs

Esperanza Rising 8-12 years old

The Turtle of Oman 6-12 years old

B at Home 8-12 years old

Marisol McDonald Doesn’t Match 4-8 years old

My Name is Yoon 4-8 years old

Homesick 8-12 years old

Persepolis a graphic novel, teens

I Hate English! ages 4+

My mom has created paper books that tell a familiar story, like Snow White, but include my kids’ names. She has also made them CDs with music that inserts their names. These make great gifts, the kids love to hear themselves in the songs and the stories and they feel like Grandma is telling them the story herself.

Record a Story Books, like this one:

Awesome Luggage Tags

After 20+ hours of travel, every suitcase starts to look the same. Help TCKs find their own bag and distinguish themselves with something like this:

Portable Battery Charger

Portable Power Adapter

Noise Canceling Headphones

My TCKs don’t have these, so I’m not offering a product review, I’ve heard these are pretty amazing. Just sayin’ TCKs probably wouldn’t be opposed to using headphones to cancel out some of the cross cultural noise they encounter.

A Local Experience

There is always another restaurant to try or trail to hike, a cultural event to participate in, or a regional sports game to catch. Find out what your TCK loves and see if you can gift them a local experience.

Their Favorite American (or passport country) Candy

If forced to choose based on taste preference, my kids would probably go for the gum and muesli cereals they have grown up on here. But there is still something special about those brightly colored candy boxes of Nerds or Smarties that rings of “treat!” My TCKs love getting surprise packages with American goodies inside.

A Commitment to Take Them Shopping

Next time they return to their home country, take them shopping for clothes or shoes, so they have something new and culturally ‘cool.’ Or, if they have Amazon Prime (I promise I don’t hate you, I’m just a little jealous), send them something the kids their same age in your country love.

TCKs, ATCKs, parents of TCKs, what other gifts would you suggest?

How Do Third Culture Kids Use Social Media?

Quick link: Third Culture Kids and Social Media

At A Life Overseas, talking about if TCKs use social media any differently than non-TCKs.

This summer, The Atlantic published a fascinating article called Has the Smartphone Destroyed a Generation? I encourage every parent, especially of tweens and teens, to read it and discuss it with your children.

I read the article with a particular mindset, that of a parent raising teenagers who also are Third Culture Kids. I wondered, how do these ideas apply to my own children? Keeping in touch is powerfully different for a suburban teen chatting with her friends from school than for a teen in Beirut chatting with her friends in Turkey or in Minnesota.

So how do TCKs, specifically, use social media? Both positively and negatively? How can we help our TCKs navigate this fraught world with wisdom and grace? I did a little unscientific survey and asked some TCKs for their perspectives.

Click here to read the rest Third Culture Kids and Social Media