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The Legacy of Annalena Tonelli, Carrying It On

Find Stronger than Death at Amazon,  Barnes and Noble,  and IndieBound

I love hearing how readers are moved and challenged and inspired by Stronger than Death. Some responses have even moved me to near tears.

I spoke at an English language school for adults in Djibouti. After my talk and an engaging Q/A time, students gathered in small groups to continue the discussion. One young man wrote his thoughts out and read them to the group. I asked if I could take a photo of his words and he gave me the paper. This is what he wrote:

“A good person is someone who displays love, joy, peace, kindness, goodness, humility, patience, and she was faithful, and endures all things. Annalena was someone who displays self-control and considers others more important than herself. Annalena was a good listener and someone who displayed integrity and dignity and accountability toward others.”

This was so beautiful and it was incredibly meaningful that he picked up on these character traits. The conversation around the tables included things like how hard it can be serve, when other people tell you to not bother, or how disappointing it can be when service is rejected. We talked about how we can all take one little step, like picking up one piece of trash. Or how we can sit beside someone who is sick and be a loving, caring presence, even if we don’t have money to help treat their illness. And how we can hope to motivate others by our example.

It was lovely.

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Here is from another reader. People have asked how I think Annalena would react to having a book written about her and I hope Jodie is right:

“I finished it with the sense that Annalena would be proud – even as one who didn’t like all the attention – because you portrayed her in her humanness as well as her saintlikeness.” Jodie P.

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Someone else told me they finished the book with tears in their eyes and with ideas for how to be more aware of students in her classroom who might need a little extra affection or attention.

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Another person told me she would use this book to help explain some of her Somali history and culture to her American coworkers.

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Thanks to all for your feedback, for reading, and for sharing.

Don’t forget to leave a review and be sure to share the book with your friends and family! Maybe a great Christmas gift…!

 

Find Stronger than Death at Amazon,  Barnes and Noble,  and IndieBound

 

 

Stronger than Death Book Tour

Come on out, bring a friend! I would LOVE to see you in person.

Mostly, I’m in Djibouti and if you live here and want to host a book event, WOW and AWESOME and please get in touch!

But, for the next month, I’ll be in the USA and if you are near these cities, I would so much love to see you. Come on out and bring a friend and let’s meet IN PERSON and with our actual faces and voices, what a pleasure that would be.

As more events are added, I’ll try to keep you updated.

All events listed are free and open to the public.

 

October 9, Washington D.C. 6:00-8:00 pm In conversation with the writer Kimberly Burge. At The Potter’s House 1658 Columbia Road, NW.

Books will be for sale, through The Potter’s House bookstore

October 10 Washington D.C. 6:30-8:00 pm In conversation with Heather Rice-Minus. At the American Enterprise Institute 1789 Massachusetts Avenue, NW

Books will be for sale, thanks to our friends at The Potter’s House.

October 14 Colorado Springs, Colorado, Glen Eyrie HQ building: 3820 N. 30th St, room 256C, books will be available in the bookstore. 12:00-1:00

October 15 Chicago, Illinois, at Wheaton College. In conversation with Professor Drew Bratcher 7:00 to 9:30 p.m. Todd M. Beamer Center Lower Level, Phelps Room

October 18 Minneapolis/St. Paul LAUNCH PARTY at Afro Deli 6:00 pm 5 West 7th Place. St Paul, MN

There will be a Q/A time, books for sale, I’ll be signing them, there will be fun door prizes, and great food by Afro Deli, be sure to order more from the menu, too, you’ll want to try all the deliciousness. I can actually say: Djiboutiliciousness because the owner is Djiboutian! We have changed places: me, the Minnesotan in Djibouti and him, the Djiboutian in Minnesota. Come on out, enjoy a night of good food, friends, and celebration.

Books will be for sale, through Maegers and Quinn bookstore.

October 24 St. Olaf, Minnesota I’ll be speaking with students 8:00 a.m. This is the only event that is just for the students, but if you are nearby, let me know and we can connect after the class.

October 26 St. Paul, Minnesota Location and time TBD, MinneSLIFE event

October 27 Moundsview, Minnesota

Back to the Horn of Africa…

Publication Day(!!!!) and Why This Story Matters Right Now

I used four exclamation points in the title.

Let that be a sign unto you.

Publication date…today!

Find Stronger than Death at Amazon,  Barnes and Noble,  and IndieBound

 

Why this book, why right now?

Has anyone else noticed how broken and sad and angry the world feels lately?

I feel it in my bones, a hunger for hope, love, compassion, goodness.

But, I don’t want those if they come through avoiding the hard things like racism, elitism, cruelty, harassment, oppression, diseases, stigmas.

This story required me to write straight into the hard.

Like being a white woman in Africa. Like engaging in violence on female bodies and fighting violence on female bodies. Like war and poverty and humanitarian failures.

But also, this story showed me the way to finding that hope and goodness I’m desperate for. It isn’t in sweeping hard conversations under the rug, it is in diving right into them with humility and humanity.

That is why now. Because I believe you are also desperate for hope, goodness, and light. You don’t want to retreat into the corner, surrounded by people just like you. You’re willing to cross boundaries and to learn how to love and live better in the diverse world that is our real world.

You’re willing to go to hard places and be changed there.

You want a love that is stronger than fear.

You want a life that is stronger than death.

Find Stronger than Death at Amazon,  Barnes and Noble,  and IndieBound

Love, Fear, and Vocation

Quick link: A Love Stronger than Fear

Plough Quarterly published a condensed excerpt from Stronger than Death for their issue on vocation.

Did you know:

“A person being treated for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis typically swallows up to 14,600 pills & endures 240 painful injections. After all that, the chance of being cured is only 50%. Join our patients and doctors in asking for shorter, more tolerable treatments to be developed.”

Annalena Tonelli worked for decades to treat tuberculosis among Somali nomads and before that, treatment required even MORE pills and LONGER treatment times.

You can read a bit about her experience with TB and her struggle between feeling a call to care for the sick and a desire to be alone with God in this article.

Amid a volatile mix of disease, war, and religious extremism in the Horn of Africa, what difference could one woman make? Annalena Tonelli stayed anyway – and found a way to beat history’s deadliest disease.

Check out the full piece here.

 

Find the book at AmazonBarnes and Noble,  and IndieBound

 

Tools for Evaluating Aid Organizations

How can you evaluate the organizations who ask for donations? Or to whom you want to donate? Here are some practical questions to ask before donating, joining, promoting, or judging that I hope you’ll find helpful.

 

Are they a registered public 501(c)(3)?

Search the organization on Charity Navigator to see their ranking.

Search them on Google and explore their work, the ways they report and tell stories, the images they use.

Contact staff members if you would like to make a personal connection. Use the email addresses and phone numbers provided. Legitimate charities would love to hear from potential donors.

What are the organization’s goals?

Are they clearly stated? Could you repeat them to someone else?

Are they measurable, qualitatively and quantitatively?

What are their specific objectives?

How will they be implemented in reaching the goals?

What impact will they have on achieving the goals? Why are these specific objectives chosen?

Who or what is the organization targeting?

What need are they aiming to meet? Why?

Have they included the community in reaching their goals and objectives?

What has the organization accomplished historically?

Did they accurately measure their outcomes?

Were they transparent in reporting?

If they failed to meet a stated objective, have they adjusted their input and goals? Did they learn from previous mistakes? Have they identified potential obstacles and how to overcome them?

Who reported on these goals and outcomes in the past? Is it only staff members or do they have field reports from their targeted people?

Does the organization have sufficient capacity to reach their goals?

In terms of personnel, expertise, connections and networks, finances and gifts-in-kind?

Does the organization measure both outputs and outcomes?

Outputs are usually numerical. Numbers of books donated, numbers of children fed, numbers of wells built, number of people served in an addiction program.

Outcomes represent the actual benefit experienced by a community.

For example: an output is: 15 people went through the addiction recovery program. An outcome is: 9 people quit drinking after completing the addiction recovery program.

According to Shoshon Tamasweet, an NGO fundraiser and consultant, “Most NGOs measure inputs like, “We distributed 1,000 mosquito nets,” or activities, “We conducted 3 health camps.” They don’t measure outcomes, let alone impact. A simple way to think of it is from the perspective of the recipient: How did their life get better?  If all they got was a hand-out, there probably is not much impact.

He concludes with, “While cost/expense ratios are sort-of meaningful, (wasteful overhead, too much spent on administration and marketing), if an organization does not or cannot measure impacts, or at least outcomes, then they are not a good place to invest for change.”

 

 

General Tips:

Don’t be fooled by fancy marketing.

Don’t give in to pressure that you must hand over your credit card information NOW!

Do be proactive in following your passion. Find an organization doing work you believe in. This will help you feel more engaged and interested in their work.

Do follow-up with the organizations you donate to. Ask about their goals and progress, check-in with staff members you might know personally.