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Unlikely Marathoners (and, Women Run Without Dropping a Uterus!)

Quick link: The Most Unlikely Marathoners

*photo by Mustafa Said

HARGEISA, SOMALILAND— A cement wall topped with barbed wire surrounds the soccer field where girls gather once a week to play. Boys climb trees or scramble up the wall to peer inside and armed guards chase them away. Here, girls can run.

Across town is a basketball court, not quite regulation-size, also inside a protective wall with a locked front gate. About a dozen girls, most of whom have never played basketball before, are learning ball-handling skills and how to shoot. Here, too, girls can run.

A women-only fitness center downtown has treadmills, but most girls can’t afford the time or money to join, and the hours are limited. For those who can run here, the treadmills are wired to shut down after 15 minutes, to protect the women from injuring themselves.

Female Somali athletes have yet to make any kind of splash in the international running scene. Mo Farah, a Somalia-born Brit, is a four-time Olympic gold medalist and the most well-known Somali runner. Ayanleh Souleiman, a Somali from Djibouti, is one of the best active middle-distance runner in the world. Mumin Guelleh, another Somali Djiboutian, placed 12th in his first-ever marathon at the Rio Olympics.

But the most famous Somali runner on the women’s side is probably Samia Yusuf Omar, who is known more for her death than for her life. She competed in the 400 meters in the 2008 Olympics then, in 2012, worked her way from Mogadishu to Djibouti, then across northern Africa. She boarded a boat, hoping to reach Europe and a life where she could live without fear of being shot by terrorists. On the way, the boat capsized and Samia drowned. She was 21 years old…”

Click here to read the rest of the piece, in Deadspin (!!)

Gift Guide for Writers, 2018

The Situation and the Story, the art of personal narrative by Vivian Gornick

On Writing Well, the classic guide to writing nonfiction

Give the gift of time. Send your writer on a retreat. Offer to babysit or book them a room at a retreat center or if you have a cabin or empty room at your home, invite them to use it. Then when they come over, do.not.engage with them. Let them write and be silent and don’t interrupt.

Classes. Online or in person. See if your town has a literary center. If not, check out The Loft online courses or Gotham Writers Workshop. I have loved The Loft and am still in regular contact with several writers I met through classes there 7 years ago.

Subscription to their goal publication magazine or a beautifully produced magazine that really deserves to be read in print. Suggestions include Plough Quarterly, Ruminate, the Pacific Standard.

Tiny notebooks. Every writer needs several of these, one for every bag they carry, for the car, for the bedside table, maybe even for their running kit.

Pens. These are the only pens I will write with. Trouble is, the clip part always snaps off. I think the packages should come with extra caps. Oh well, I can rotate the caps after I use up the pens.

Small candy. I suggested this last year, too, specifically Swedish Fish. So this year I’ll suggest gum drops. They are small, so writers can eat a good-sized handful. And, they stick in the teeth, so the flavor and chewing lasts an extra long time.

Also, candy canes.

Jane Austen book coasters. Last year I shared this Jane Austen mug. This year, put it on something.

*contains affiliate links

*for more ideas, see the 2017 list

By |December 5th, 2018|Categories: Writing|Tags: , |0 Comments

A Quiz about Fear

Quick link: 10 Dangerous Things for Kids and One True Danger, a Quiz, at A Life Overseas

I recently heard an interview with Kim Brooks, the author of Small Animals, parenthood in the age of fear, and was reminded of how irrational fear can be. Understandably so, but still, in an age of fear and also judgment and rage, parenting can feel fraught with risk.

I had written this quiz several years ago, but found it again in my drafts and pulled it out to publish now. What are we generally afraid of? What should we actually fear (if anything?)

A quiz:

  1. Are Americans more at risk of dying by terrorist or dying by an appliance falling on us?

Death by appliance.

  1. Is a predator more likely to attack a child walking home from the playground alone or to attack a child playing in the home?

Child playing at home.

  1. Does a child face more of a health risk while climbing a tree or while staring at an iPad?

Staring at an iPad.

Click here to continue with the quiz and to read my conclusion: 10 Dangerous Things for Kids and One True Danger, a Quiz, at A Life Overseas

Finding Home, Third Culture Kids in the World. E-book Announcement!

Back in 2012-13 I hosted a guest post series on Djibouti Jones called Painting Pictures, about raising, being, and loving Third Culture Kids.

Now, six years later, it is time to revisit the essays, the authors, and the ideas. I compiled the posts, combined them with interviews and updates from the authors, and included a few suggestions for how to take the essays and make them personal for your own family and experience.

The final product is a book called Finding Home: Third Culture Kids in the World and it will be available on May 22!

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Here’s a preview. Special thanks to Cecily Paterson, for creating the lovely cover. And special thanks to all the essay contributors! You’ll hear more about them in the coming weeks.